Category Archives: Environmental Humanities

Agricultural Landscapes: Perspectives from the Environmental Humanities

Earlier this week I chaired and introduced a panel at the 2015 Forum of the Council of the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) in Melbourne. The panel was put together by my colleague Matthew Kearnes and I and focused on environmental humanities approaches to agricultural landscapes. We had three fabulous speakers: Lauren Rickards (RMIT University), Cameron Muir (ANU) and Aidan Davison (UTas).

Continue reading

Remaking Nature, the MOOC…

Over the past few months my colleagues and I in the Environmental Humanities Program at UNSW have been developing a MOOC. For those of you not yet caught up in this global trend, a MOOC is a “massive open online course.” Basically, they’re interactive courses set up online so that people anywhere can do them.

Continue reading

Flight Ways on the New Books Network seminar

A great interview on Flight Ways has just been posted on the New Books Network seminar. Thanks so much to Carla Nappi for taking the time to read the book and chat with me.

Continue reading

Back from the brink – an interview on ABC Radio National

On Monday morning I appeared on a short program on the ABC Radio National program ‘Life Matters‘. We talked about extinction, conservation and ethics. You can listen to the full audio here.

Image: A Distant Memory (SMITEME/flickr.com/CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Some forthcoming papers: conservation and extinction

For the last couple of years my research on ethics, extinction and conservation has focused on Hawai’i, and the Hawaiian crow (or alala) in particular. I seem to have accumulated a fair few articles and book chapters that are waiting on publication so I’ve done up a little page on this site to give some indication of what I’ve been up to. You can find more details here.

The picture to the right is the view from the back porch of the house we stayed in while doing fieldwork on the Big Island in early 2013. We were near the summit of Kilauea where it’s cold and rainy most of the time (at least in my experience) and quite a drive from the beach. But who wants beaches when you can have this spectacular forest?